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Notice of County Commissioners meeting, Nov. 2

The Granville County Board of Commissioners will meet remotely by Zoom conference call on Monday, Nov. 2, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. for the regular scheduled meeting. In order to adhere to the COVID-19 restrictions, the meeting may be accessed by a Zoom link. 

 

Please contact the County Administration Office at 919-693-5240 to receive the registration link.  

 

Public comments will be accepted in written format and must be received by Monday, Nov, 2 at 12:00 p.m. by mail to P.O. Box 906, Oxford, NC  27565 or email to grancomrs@granvillecounty.org.

To view the agenda, please click here.

 

Debra A. Weary

Clerk to the Granville County Board of Commissioners

Gooch sworn in as Granville County Commissioner

Jimmy Gooch of Butner was sworn in as County Commissioner on Tuesday, Oct. 27. Appointed to the Board of Commissioners at their Oct. 19 meeting, Gooch will represent District 7.

 

The swearing-in ceremony was officiated by Board Chair David T. Smith at the Granville County Expo and Convention Center. Holding the Bible for the oath was Vickie Smoak, wife of former Comm. Edgar Smoak, who passed away on Sept. 11. After the ceremony, Wendy Gooch, wife of the newly-sworn-in Commissioner, placed the lapel pin on her husband’s jacket.

 

As representative of Granville County Government and the Board, Gooch has been assigned to the following committees:
• Audit Review Committee
• Board of Equalization and Review
• Opioid Advisory Committee
• Public Safety Liaison
• Soil and Water Board Liaison
• Transportation Plan Work Group
• Water/Sewer Matters Liaison

 

Born and raised in the Wilton community of Granville County, Gooch is a graduate of South Granville High School and has extensive experience in water management. He is retired from the City of Durham.

 

Gooch previously served on the Butner Town Council, having been elected in 2017. In that role, he served as the Town’s representative to the Granville County Animal Control Advisory Committee and the Granville Greenways Advisory Council, as well as serving as a member of the Camp Butner Society and Chairman of the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority Board.

 

 

 

 

 

New picnic shelter dedicated in Grassy Creek

A new picnic shelter was dedicated at the Grassy Creek Community Center on Saturday, Oct. 24. The new structure was made possible through grant funding provided by the Granville County Parks, Greenways and Recreation Advisory Committee, and was approved by Granville County’s Board of Commissioners for the 2019/2020 fiscal year.

 

Granville County’s Parks, Greenways and Recreation programming funds are used to develop and support active and passive recreation and leisure activities for the County’s residents. The objective is to make these activities available to as many residents as possible, seeking to serve all age groups. Additional mini-grants had been awarded to the City of Creedmoor, the City of Oxford, the Town of Butner, the Town of Stovall, the Town of Stem, Granville County Senior Services, the Granville County Chamber of Commerce, the Toler Reach Out Club and Hopping Frogs Forest School during the same grant cycle.

 

The Parks, Greenways and Recreation Advisory Committee includes 11 voting members, one from each County district and four at-large members. District representatives appointed by the Board of Commissioners include Allen Nelson (District 1), Reginald Tyrone Harris (District 2), Glenda Williams (District 3), Betty Lou Davis (District 4), Joshua Averette (District 5), Ivan Washburn (District 6), and Michael McFadden (District 7). Serving as at-large members are Mara Shelton, Marilyn Howard, Richard Rote and Ginnie Currin.

 

The new picnic shelter at Grassy Creek’s Community Center joins the addition of playground equipment on site, funded and installed during the 2018/2019 grant cycle.

 

“The new picnic shelter, along with the playground, walking track and grassy areas at the Grassy Creek Community Center, provides a great venue for community and family gatherings,” said Justin Jorgensen, Granville County’s Senior Transportation Planner and Committee Advisor.

 

The Grassy Creek Community Center is located at 9121 Grassy Creek Road in Bullock.

 

Due to COVID-19, the grant application process was suspended for the 2020/2021 budget year. Applications will be made available on opening day of the next grant cycle. For more information about the Parks, Greenways and Recreation Advisory Committee, please contact Jorgensen at 919-603-1332 or at justin.jorgensen@granvillecounty.org.

 

Pictured at the ribbon cutting for the Grassy Creek picnic shelter are Justin Jorgensen, James Currin, Peggy Currin, David Smith, Travis Loftis, Pratt Winston, Ida Keeton, Sue Hinman, Ray Keeton and Zelodis Jay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Fall Clean Out” scheduled for Nov. 21 at Expo Center

On Nov. 21, residents of Granville County can bring recyclable and hazardous household items to the Expo and Convention Center in Oxford as the annual “Fall Clean Out” is held from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Due to statewide health requirements, this year’s event will be a drive-through, with assistance provided at each designated station.

 

On site to collect items for recycling and safe disposal will be the following vendors:

 

* Veolia – will be collecting paint, paint-related materials, household cleaners, old gasoline, drain cleaners, fluorescent light tubes and other hazardous household materials;

 

* Department of Agriculture – will be accepting pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, weed killers, etc.;

 

* Shred Ace – will be providing on-site document shredding;

 

* Interstate Batteries – will be collecting car batteries, motorcycle/boat batteries, lithium/lithium ion batteries, hearing aid and watch batteries, etc.; and

 

* Granville County Sheriff’s Office – will be collecting medications, inhalers, sharps, diabetic supplies, ammunition, flares and fireworks.

 

In addition, scrap metal such as junk lawnmowers, broken appliances, bicycles and metal furniture will be accepted, as well as electronics (computers, televisions, laptops, printers, etc.) for recycling.

 

The Granville County Humane Society will also be on site to accept donations of pet supplies, dog and cat food, leashes, collars, crates, pet beds, kitty litter and towels.

 

Last year’s event resulted in the collection of 6,200 pounds of paint, more than 700 pounds of pesticides/fungicides/herbicides, 3,100 pounds of electronics, 3,000 pounds of scrap metal, 5,000 pounds of shredded paper, 2,900 pounds of household chemicals and many more household items.

 

“We appreciate everyone’s efforts in keeping these harmful items out of the community and the environment,” said Teresa Baker, Granville County Recycling and Sustainability Coordinator.

 

For more details, contact Baker at 919-725-1417 or at bakertd@gcs.k12.nc.us.

 

Granville County Sheriff offers Halloween safety tips

Although Halloween may be celebrated differently this year, there are ways to enjoy safe trick-or-treating. The Granville County Sheriff’s Office reminds residents to follow common sense practices, along with adhering to statewide health requirements.

 

In some communities across the county, traditional house-to-house trick-or-treating is at the discretion of individual households and neighborhoods. If choosing to participate, the Sheriff’s Office asks that door-to-door treats – where candy is handed out to children – be limited. Also, please use hand sanitizer between visits. Households are encouraged to have hand sanitizer readily available, as a precautionary measure.

 

The Sheriff also reminds trick-or-treaters that a costume mask is no substitute for a protective cloth mask. Please remember to cover the mouth and nose, as required by the Centers for Disease Control, for the most effective protection from COVID-19. Social distancing is also required, as mandated by the State of North Carolina.

 

Other safety tips include:

   * Costumes should not include any sharp objects;

   * Only fire-retardant materials should be used for costumes;

   * Carry a flashlight or glow stick after dark;

   * Only visit homes with the porch light on;

   * Don’t go inside anyone’s home;

   * Travel only in familiar areas and along an established route;

    * Watch for obstacles on lawns, steps or porches

   * Enter and exit driveways and alleys carefully;

   * Walk, don’t run, from house to house;

   * Throw away any candy that is unwrapped or has a strange odor, color

      or texture.

 

“The Halloween season has always been filled with enjoyment,” said Sheriff Charles R. Noblin, Jr. “If choosing to participate in trick-or-treating in your neighborhood this year, let’s make it a fun and safe experience for everyone.”

Notice of Public Hearing

Granville County is preparing an application to the North Carolina Department of Commerce for a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) for Economic Development. The application will request up to $460,000 in CDBG Building Reuse funds. The County intends to use the funds to assist in the renovation of a portion of a 150,000 square foot building located at 200 Business Drive in Butner near the intersection of NC Highway 56 and I-85.

 

Nugget Comfort LLC is a manufacturer of children’s foam products and has created the Nugget, a blended couch and toy. In order to make the facility suitable for their business and the manufacturing of children’s foam furniture, renovations will need to be made to the building, primarily in the areas of the cafeteria, offices and workshop. Renovation activities will include, but are not limited to, electrical, plumbing, piping, drywall, flooring, and painting. As a result of the project, 46 new jobs will be created with 60% going to persons residing in low to moderate income households.

 

Granville County will meet remotely by ZOOM video/conference call and conduct a Public Hearing on Monday, October 19, 2020 at 7 p.m. The purpose of the Hearing is to obtain citizens input into the identification of economic needs and desired economic development activities. The input from the Hearing will be incorporated into the County’s consideration and submission of a CDBG application to the Department of Commerce. Efforts will be made during the meeting to receive verbal comments from interested individuals attending the remote meeting. Written comments received prior to the opening of the Public Hearing will be considered and may be sent to Debra Weary, Clerk to the Board, 141 Williamsboro Street, Oxford, NC 27565. Zoom meeting information can be found by accessing the calendar on the County’s website on Friday prior to the meeting – www.granvillecounty.org .

 

This information is available in Spanish or any other language upon request.  Please contact Debra Weary at 919-603-1307 for accommodations for this request.  

 

 

 

Esta información está disponible está disponible en español o en cualquier otro idioma bajo petición. Póngase en contacto con Debra Weary at 919-603-1307 de alojamiento para esta solicitud.

Census data collection set to end on October 15

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Oct. 13 that data collection for the 2020 Census would end on Oct. 15. As of that date at 11:59 p.m., all operations for the 2020 Census will be concluded.

 

The deadline has changed more than once, moving from Sept. 30 to Oct. 31, back to Oct. 5, and then being extended again to Oct. 31 as decisions have been made, challenged and appealed. This latest decision sets an Oct. 15 end date for internet self-response, phone participation and mailed surveys. Census takers will continue resolving non-responsive addresses through the end of the day on Oct. 15.

 

The Census Bureau reports that 99.9 percent of households have been accounted for in the 2020 Census. This includes a 63.2 percent self-response rate for the state of North Carolina. Census takers have also been going door to door since mid-August to ensure that non-responsive households are being included in the population count.

 

The Census is mandated by the U.S. Constitution to take place every 10 years. Results of the Census determine government representation, as well as impacting funding decisions. Billions of dollars in federal funding are appropriated to states, counties and communities based on statistics derived from the Census each decade. This funding is earmarked for infrastructure, education, healthcare, emergency services and other needs. According to the North Carolina Office of State Budget and Management, 2020 Census data will bring funding of $1,823 per person, per year back to N.C. communities.

 

 

In Granville County, 67.9 percent of all households have responded to the Census through self-response. Residents who have not yet responded are urged to complete the Census online (my2020census.gov), by phone (844-330-2020 in English, 844-468-2020 in Spanish) or by paper form by 11:59 p.m. on Oct. 15.

Are you prepared for an earthquake or tremors?

On Oct. 15 at 10:15 a.m., North Carolina residents and businesses will have an opportunity to participate in the 2020 Great Southeast Shakeout, an annual public earthquake drill where millions of people across the region – organizations, schools, businesses and homes – can simultaneously practice “Drop, Cover and Hold On,” which is the recommended action for people to take during an earthquake.

 

 

Although it is not a highly likely event in Granville County, the area did experience tremors on Aug. 9. 2020 when the state reported its strongest earthquake in almost 100 years. On that date, a 5.1 magnitude earthquake and several aftershocks resulted in reports of damage to houses and commercial buildings in Alleghany County and surrounding communities. Many Granville County residents reported experiencing tremors from that event.

 

Granville County Emergency Services encourages all residents, students, business owners, organizations and any other interested parties to be familiar with the proper way to reduce injury during an earthquake or aftershocks. Drills like the Great Southeast Shakeout will help prepare for hazards that exist at home, at work, at school or during travel.

 

In case of an earthquake, remember to Drop, Cover and Hold On:

 

DROP where you are on your hands and knees. This position will protect you from being knocked down while allowing you to stay low and crawl to a nearby shelter.

 

COVER your head and neck with one arm and hand. If a sturdy desk or table is nearby, crawl underneath it for shelter. If no shelter is nearby, crawl next to an interior wall (away from windows.) Stay on your knees; bend over to protect vital organs.

 

HOLD ON until the shaking stops. Under shelter, hold onto your shelter with one hand and be ready to move with it if it shifts. If no shelter, hold on to your head and neck with both arms and hands.

 

“Drop, Cover and Hold On” is the recommended action to take during an earthquake because it allows you to get down before you are thrown to the ground, provides protection from falling or flying items and increases the chances of surviving a building collapse. Most injuries or deaths during an earthquake come from falling objects, such as heavy furniture, televisions, lamps or other common items. After the earthquake, it is also important to watch for any items that may fall in an aftershock.

 

The “ShakeOut” began in southern California in 2008 as a drill designed to educate the public about how to protect themselves during an earthquake. Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills are now held in more than 20 official ShakeOut regions, along with an option for people in any other areas to register and be counted in the global participation total.

 

Although Oct. 15 is the official ShakeOut date this year, another date and time – or multiple dates – can be chosen to accommodate as many people and schedules as possible. 

 

To learn more about the Great Southeast ShakeOut, please click here: https://www.shakeout.org/southeast/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s fall wildfire season in North Carolina

In North Carolina, the fall wildfire season typically lasts from mid-October until mid-December. During this time, the N.C. Forest Service and the USDA Forest Service urge residents and visitors to be cautious with campfires and when burning yard debris.

 

“The leading cause of wildfires in North Carolina is debris burning,” said North Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “As leaves begin to fall and vegetation starts to dry out, it’s important for everyone to use extreme caution when burning debris of any kind. Let’s all remember that our best defense against wildfires starts at home.”

 

For people who choose to burn debris, the N.C. Forest Service offers the following tips:

  • Consider alternatives to burning. Some types of debris, such as leaves, grass and stubble, may be of more value if they used for mulch instead.
  • Check local burning laws. Some communities allow burning only during specified hours. Others forbid it entirely.
  • Make sure you have a valid permit. You can obtain a burn permit at any authorized permitting agent open for business or online at www.ncforestservice.gov/burnpermit.
  • Don’t pile vegetation on the ground; instead, place it in a cleared area and contain it in a screened receptacle away from overhead branches and wires. Keep your pile small, not tall.
  • Stay informed about the weather and possible weather changes. Postpone outdoor burning during high winds or gusts, or periods of low relative humidity. Even if you have a valid permit, stop burning if strong winds develop.
  • Household trash should be hauled away to a trash or recycling station. It is illegal to burn anything other than yard debris.
  • Be sure you are fully prepared before burning. To control the fire, you will need a hose, bucket, steel rake and a shovel for tossing dirt on the fire. Keep a phone nearby, too.
  • Never use kerosene, gasoline, diesel fuel or other flammable liquids to speed up debris burning.
  • Stay with your fire until it is completely out.
  • Local fire officials can recommend a safe way to burn debris.
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When burning agricultural residue and forestland litter, a fire line should be plowed around the area to be burned. Large fields should be separated into small plots for burning one at a time. Before doing any burning in a wooded area, contact your county ranger.

 

Defensible space around your home is important. Clear debris from your roof and gutters. Store firewood and other combustible items at least 30 feet from your home, uphill if possible. For more information and tips to help create a defensible space around your home and protect your property from wildfire, visit www.resistwildfirenc.org.

 

The USDA Forest Service also reminds campers to be cautious with campfires. Use existing fire rings, if possible, and clear a safe area around them of at least 15 feet. Never leave campfires unattended, and ensure they are completely out before leaving.

 

The USDA Forest Service offers the following guidelines for safely extinguishing campfires and helping to prevent wildfires:

  • Allow the wood to burn completely to ash, if possible.
  • Pour lots of water on the fire, drown ALL embers, not just the red ones.
  • Pour until the hissing sound stops.
  • Stir campfire ashes and embers with a shovel.
  • Scrape the sticks and logs to remove any embers.
  • Stir and make sure everything is wet and that embers are cold to the touch.
  • If you do not have water, use dirt. Pour dirt or sand on the fire, mixing enough dirt or sand with the embers to extinguish the fire.
  • Continue adding or stirring until all remaining material is cool.
  • Do NOT bury the fire as the fire will continue to smolder and could catch roots on fire that will eventually get to the surface and start a wildfire.

Always exercise caution with any outdoor burning. Even when burn bans are not in effect, weather conditions may not be favorable for outdoor fires, Troxler said. Outdoor burning is discouraged during periods of low humidity or high winds.

 

To learn more about fire safety and preventing wildfires and loss of property, visit www.ncforestservice.gov  or contact Granville County Ranger Rob Montague at 919-693-3154.

Granville County Notice of Public Hearing

Granville County is preparing an application to the North Carolina Department of Commerce for a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) for Economic Development. The application will request up to $460,000 in CDBG Building Reuse funds. The County intends to use the funds to assist in the renovation of a portion of a 150,000 square foot building located at 200 Business Drive in Butner near the intersection of NC Highway 56 and I-85.

 

Nugget Comfort LLC is a manufacturer of children’s foam products and has created the Nugget, a blended couch and toy. In order to make the facility suitable for their business and the manufacturing of children’s foam furniture, renovations will need to be made to the building, primarily in the areas of the cafeteria, offices and workshop. Renovation activities will include, but are not limited to, electrical, plumbing, piping, drywall, flooring, and painting. As a result of the project, 46 new jobs will be created with 60% going to persons residing in low to moderate income households.

 

Granville County will meet remotely by ZOOM video/conference call and conduct a Public Hearing on Monday, October 19, 2020 at 7 p.m. The purpose of the Hearing is to obtain citizens input into the identification of economic needs and desired economic development activities. The input from the Hearing will be incorporated into the County’s consideration and submission of a CDBG application to the Department of Commerce. Efforts will be made during the meeting to receive verbal comments from interested individuals attending the remote meeting. Written comments received prior to the opening of the Public Hearing will be considered and may be sent to Debra Weary, Clerk to the Board, 141 Williamsboro Street, Oxford, NC 27565. Zoom meeting information can be found by accessing the calendar on the County’s website on Friday prior to the meeting – www.granvillecounty.org .

 

This information is available in Spanish or any other language upon request.  Please contact Debra Weary at 919-603-1307 for accommodations for this request.  

 

 

 

 

Esta información está disponible está disponible en español o en cualquier otro idioma bajo petición. Póngase en contacto con Debra Weary at 919-603-1307 de alojamiento para esta solicitud.

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