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Stories Across Granville

Grant cycle begins for Parks and Recreation

The Granville County Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee will begin accepting grant applications for the upcoming year on Dec. 3, 2018. The 2018-2019 grant application period runs Dec. 3, 2019 until Feb. 1, 2020.

 

The application will be available at www.granvillecounty.org/residents/recreation or by hard copy from the Granville County Manager’s Office in Oxford. All applications must be submitted by Feb. 1, 2019 by 5 p.m. Applications should be submitted by email to charla.duncan@granvillecounty.org, or in person/by mail to the County Manager’s Office, 141 Williamsboro Street, P.O. Box 906, Oxford NC, 27565.

 

Granville County’s Parks and Recreation Programming Funds are used to facilitate the development and support of active and passive recreation and leisure activities for Granville County residents.  The objective is to make these activities available to as many residents as possible, and to include a broad spectrum of participants.  Recreation programming should seek to serve all age groups.  The Granville County Recreation Advisory Committee Bylaws prohibit discrimination in the use of funds.

 

Recreational priorities include walking trails, playgrounds, ADA and inclusive recreation equipment and recreation for youth and adults of varying needs, outdoor fitness equipment, dog parks, basketball, bicycle trails, picnic shelters and tables, pickleball courts, facilities and activities that do not require a membership fee and open park space for family friendly activities/passive recreation.

 

Applicants must be a government entity or non-profit organization. While those interested in applying for these funds do not have to be a registered 501c-3, it is encouraged.

 

Submitted requests may not exceed $25,000.

 

Grant information sessions will be held throughout the cycle. Visit www.granvillecounty.org/residents/recreation or contact the County Manager’s Office at 919-693-5240 for more details about these sessions.

 

To learn more about this grant, contact Granville County Management Analyst Charla Duncan by phone at 919-693-5240 or by email at  charla.duncan@granvillecounty.org.

Welcome to Granville County’s new 4H agent!

 

Granville County Cooperative Extension announces the addition of Emily Roberts to their staff, who will serve as the new 4H agent.

 

A native of Creedmoor, Roberts is a graduate of South Granville High School and a earned her degree in Extension Education at North Carolina State University, with a minor in Animal Science. She has previous experience as an intern with Person County Cooperative Extension, planning the 4H Summer Fun program in that area and engaging with youth through educational activities and programs such as public speaking, agriculture and volunteerism.

 

Roberts has also volunteered with livestock shows and other activities through 4H, as well as serving as a volunteer with Helping Horse Therapeutic Riding in Raleigh, where she assisted disabled youth in the riding therapy program.

 

Roberts began work on Nov. 1. To contact her, call the Granville County Cooperative Extension Service at (919) 603-1350.

 

Welcome, Emily!

 

Protect yourself against rabies

NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES: Rabies is a deadly viral disease that attacks the central nervous system of warm-blooded animals, particularly mammals. In North Carolina, the most common type of rabies is raccoon-variant rabies, found commonly in raccoons, skunks, red and grey foxes, coyotes, wolves, groundhogs and beavers. Bats can also transmit rabies but have their own bat variant rabies virus. Any mammal can become infected with rabies. The virus can infect domestic pets, agricultural animals such as cows and horses, and people when they are exposed to rabid wildlife.

 

North Carolina’s rabies laws conform to recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Association of Public Health Veterinarians’ Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control . North Carolina rabies law requires that all owned dogs, cats and ferrets must be vaccinated against rabies by four months of age (NCGS 130A-185 ). One shot is not enough; rabies vaccinations must be kept current. Talk to your veterinarian about when your pet needs its rabies booster shots. To find a veterinarian, see the N.C. Veterinary Medical Association’s website.

 

If your pet is not currently vaccinated and is bitten by an animal that is or might be rabid, animal control is required by law to either quarantine the pet for six months or euthanize it (NCGS 130A-197) That choice must be made by the local health director.

 

In North Carolina and across the U.S., the domestic animal that is most commonly infected with rabies is the cat. Cats that are kept outside unsupervised may prey on wildlife that are infested with rabies. 

 

Enjoy wildlife, but at a distance. Never try to approach, handle, feed or rescue wild animals. It is against the law in North Carolina to keep or try to rehabilitate wild animals that may carry rabies. Wild carnivores (meat-eating mammals) are likely to be infected with rabies (eastern raccoon variant) in virtually every county of N.C. 

 

What You Can Do
Vaccinate your pets against rabies and keep the vaccinations current.

Keep pets inside.

Supervise pets outside, and keep dogs on a leash.

Do not feed pets outside. Pet food and mulch attract wildlife.

Do not feed wildlife, feral cats or feral dogs.

Secure garbage cans with wildlife-proof lids.

 

If you are bitten or scratched by any animal, clean the wound out well with soap and running water for 15 minutes and contact your doctor. Be certain to write down the location of the animal and a description of the animal to provide to animal control. Do not try to catch any wild animal that bites or scratches you. Call animal control immediately to capture the animal for rabies testing. If the animal is someone’s pet, also get the owner’s name and address and give them to the animal control officer.

 

Any mammal can transmit rabies. The animal that bit you, depending on the species and circumstances, will have to be evaluated or tested for rabies. For dogs, cats, and ferrets, animal control may be able to locate the animal based on the information you provide, and place the animal in 10-day confinement as designated by the local health director (NCGS 130A-196).

 

If you find a bat in your home, isolate it to one room, leave the room and close the doors. Call animal control to capture the bat for testing. Most human rabies cases in the United States are due to unrecognized exposures to bats (bat variant rabies). You may not recognize a bat bite or scratch, because the wounds they cause are so small. Most bats do not carry rabies in North Carolina; only about 3 percent of bats are infected. But because a diagnosis can’t be made by looking at an animal, animals must be assumed to be infected with rabies until a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis is made. Learn more about bats from Bat Conservation International and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Bats and Rabies website.

 

In North Carolina, the State Laboratory of Public Health tests wildlife rabies vectors (animals that may carry rabies) that have bitten or otherwise exposed a person or a domestic animal that is not currently vaccinated. Dogs, cats and ferrets are also tested if they get sick with signs of rabies or die during a 10- day confinement after biting a person (NCGS 130A-199 ). Other animals may be submitted for testing with prior approval by the state public health veterinarians. Your county’s animal control agency will have all the information needed to submit animals for rabies testing.

 

 

GRANVILLE COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL CAN BE CONTACTED AT 919-693-6749.

Third Annual “Santa Paws” event scheduled

The Third Annual “Santa Paws” event will be held on Saturday, Dec. 8 from 6:30 until 9 p.m. at Granville County Expo and Convention Center in Oxford. Santa Claus will be making time for the dogs and cats of the Granville County Animal Shelter to help with this donation drive. 

 

Participants are asked to please bring a donation for the Animal Shelter in exchange for a picture with Santa. Donation ideas include flea and tick treatment (no Hartz), durable dog toys, fabuloso, cat litter, cat toys, cloth towels, dish soap and paper towels.

 

Pets, kids and adults are welcome. There will be light hors d’oeuvres and refreshments provided. 

 

The Granville County Expo and Convention Center is located at 4185 Hwy 15 South in Oxford. For more details, call 919-693-6749 or visit www.granvillecounty.org.

 

Thanksiving fire safety tips

During the holiday season, the danger of fire typically increases, with most of those fires starting in the kitchen or outside cooking area.

Granville County Emergency Services Director Doug Logan advises residents not to leave the stove or oven unattended when cooking, and to have working smoke detectors and fire extinguishers in the home. It is recommended that there should be a smoke detector in each bedroom and on each floor.

“A good fire extinguisher can save lives and property,” Logan says. “Make sure to keep one handy and know how to use it!”

 Other fire safety tips provided by FEMA and the U.S. Fire Administration include these:

1.     Ranges account for the largest share of home cooking fire incidents. Be sure to watch what you are cooking;

2.     Frying poses the greatest risk of fire. Keep a pan lid or baking sheet nearby to quickly cover possible flames;

3.     Turn pot handles towards the back of the stove;

4.     Wear short sleeves or roll sleeves up when cooking. Clothing is often the first item ignited during cooking fires;

5.     Help prevent outdoor cooking fires by using grills and turkey fryers away from siding or deck railings;

6.     Never leave grills, fire pits, turkey fryers or patio torches unattended;

7.     If frying a turkey, remember that an over-filled cooking pot will cause oil to spill over when the turkey is placed inside;

8.     Dispose of coals – after they have cooled – in a metal can. If frying a turkey, let hot grease cool before disposing of it

9.     Turkey fryers can easily overturn and start a fire. Be sure the base is sturdy and watch carefully;

10.  Keep kids and pets away from hot surfaces.

 

“The holiday season shouldn’t be anything but happy reunions and celebrations, never tragedy as the result of a fire,” Logan says. 

 

If you have any questions about smoke detectors or fire extinguishers, Logan recommends a call to your local fire department.

 

Granville County Emergency Services wishes all residents a safe and happy Thanksgiving!

Applications to be accepted for Energy Assistance

Applications will be taken during the month of December for the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP). The Granville County Department of Social Services will be taking applications for the following persons only:

  • Households with a member age 60 and above (must be responsible for their own heating expense); OR
  • Persons disabled and receiving services through the Division of Aging and Adult Services.

 

Applications will be taken at the Department of Social Services from Dec. 1 through Dec. 31.

For added convenience, Carolyn Trappiel, DSS Income Maintenance Supervisor, will also be on site at the following locations to accept applications:

   Dec. 5 – North Granville Senior Center in Stovall, 9:30 a.m. until noon;

   Dec. 10 – South Granville Senior Center in Creedmoor, beginning at 9 a.m.;

   Dec. 11 – Granville County Senior Center in Oxford, beginning at 9 a.m.

 

There will be no appointments as applications will be taken on a first-come, first-served basis.

 

Applications for all other households will be taken from January through March 31 or until funds are exhausted.

 

Payments will be made directly to the heating provider. Every household seeking assistance must complete an application for LIEHP. Applicants should bring identification; Social Security numbers for everyone in the home; proof of income for the prior month; a heating bill with account number included; and a bank statement. If applying for someone else, a statement giving authorization to apply on their behalf is required.

 

The Granville County Department of Social Services is located at 410 W. Spring Street in Oxford. Contact Carolyn Trappiel at 919-603-3356 for more information.

Do you know how to recycle in Granville County?

Did you know that you can place certain materials together for recycling and take them to any Granville County convenience drop-off site? Beverage cartons; glass food jars; glass beverage bottles (without lids); aluminum, tin and steel cans; flattened cardboard; plastic cleaning bottles and containers; plastic food and beverage tubs, jugs and bottles; plastic bathroom bottles (without pumps); newspaper, magazines, phonebooks and catalogs; mixed paper, office paper, glossy paper, envelopes and post-it notes; food boxes, paper boxes, paper towel rolls, paper egg cartons and paper bags can all be co-mingled, after food and liquids are emptied out. 

 

NOT accepted with mixed recycling are plastic bags, styrofoam, household trash, medical waste, scrap metal, food waste, broken glass, window or mirror glass, light bulbs, clothing or fabric, hardcover books, , shredded paper, and aluminum foil or trays.

 

Please take clean and dry plastic bags separately or return them to your local grocery store. 

 

Also accepted at Granville County convenience drop-off sites is used cooking oil, used motor oil and filters, anti-freeze, CFC bulbs and tubes, televisions, radios, cell phones computers, cords, scrap metal and large appliances, small construction and demolition debris from households, household trash and bulky furniture.

 

NOT accepted are tires (must be taken to Oxford Landfill), yard waste and brush, commercial or industrial waste, hazardous waste, liquid waste (paint, cleaners, etc), car batteries and wood pallets.

 

Granville County operates and maintains staffed convenience drop-off sites in Oxford, Butner, Wilton, Berea, Grassy Creek, Oak Hill and Bullock. These sites are for residential waste and recycling ONLY. All commercial and industrial waste generators must contract with a private waste hauler or take waste directly to the Landfill located at 6584 Landfill Road in Oxford. 

 

For more information, visit www.granvillecounty.org/residents/trash-recycling or pick up one of Granville County’s new ‘Solid Waste and Recycling’ guides today! 

 

Veterans Day Proclamation

At their Nov. 5 meeting, Granville County Commissioners approved a proclamation request from the United States World War One Centennial Commission to call on all Americans across the nation to pause at 11:00 a.m. on November 11, 2018 to recognize and give thanks for the service and sacrifice of those who served in World War I, commemorating  the 100th anniversary of the Armistice that ended the fighting in World War I at 11:00 a.m., November 11, 1918 – the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. The proclamation has been adopted and endorsed by all members of the Board.

 

 

 

Library to host folklore author Sharyn McCrumb

New York Times’ best-selling author Sharyn McCrumb will make a special presentation at the Richard H. Thornton Library in Oxford on Thursday, Nov. 15 at 5:30 p.m.

 

Best known for her Appalachian “ballad novels” set in the North Carolina/Tennessee mountains, McCrumb’s body of work includes ‘She Walks These Hills,’ ‘The Rosewood Casket,’ ‘The Songcatcher’ and ‘Ghost Riders,’ as well as ‘The Ballad of Tom Dooley’ and ‘King’s Mountain,’ which take place in North Carolina. Her most current novels include ‘Prayers the Devil Answers,’ the story of the last public hanging ever carried out in the United States, and ‘The Unquiet Grave,’ the story of West Virginia’s Greenbrier Ghost.

 

“I find that the more I write, the more fascinated I become with the idea of the land as an intricate element in the lives of mountain people, and of the past as prologue for any contemporary narrative,” McCrumb has said of her work. “This connection to the land is personal as well as thematic.”

 

Awards and honors McCrumb has garnered include the Patricia Winn Award for Southern Fiction from the Clarksville/Montgomery County Arts and Heritage Council of Clarksville, TN; the Mary Frances Hobson Prize for Southern Literature by North Carolina’s Chowan University; the Achievement in Literature Award from the Edward Buncombe Chapter of the N.C. Daughters of the American Revolution; and the Perry F. Kendig Award for Literary Arts from Blue Ridge Arts Council of southwest Virginia, as well as other prestigious recognitions. In 2006, McCrumb was named winner of the Book of the Year Award from the Appalachian Writers Association.

 

McCrumb’s work has been studied in universities around the world and her novels have been translated into eleven languages. She has lectured at Oxford University, the University of Bonn-Germany and at the Smithsonian Institution, as well as teaching a writers’ workshop in Paris.

 

The author will be discussing these award-winning Appalachian “ballad novels,” as well as her other books, during this presentation. The Richard H. Thornton Library is located at 210 Main Street in Oxford. For more information, contact the library at 919-693-1121 or visit www.granville.lib.nc.us.

 

 

November is Adoption Awareness Month

November is Adoption Awareness Month. Every child deserves a forever family.

 

Each year, more than 100,000 children in foster care are available for adoption. The average child waits for an adoptive family for two years; however, many children with special needs such as physical, mental and emotional disabilities – as well as sibling groups and teenagers – often  spend more than five years waiting for permanent, loving homes. 

 

You don’t have to be perfect to be a perfect parent. To learn how to become a foster/adoptive parent, contact the Granville County Department of Social Services at 919-693-1511.

 

A special celebration for Adoption Awareness Month will be held on Friday, Nov. 16 from 6 until 8 p.m. at the Granville County Expo and Convention Center, 4185 Highway 15 in Oxford. For more information, contact LeVerne Smith, Adoption Specialist, at 919-603-3348

 

 

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